↓ Skip to main content

CMAJ

Article Metrics

Photoplethysmography using a smartphone application for assessment of ulnar artery patency: a randomized clinical trial

Overview of attention for article published in CMAJ, April 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#48 of 5,261)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
32 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
86 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Readers on

mendeley
6 Mendeley
Title
Photoplethysmography using a smartphone application for assessment of ulnar artery patency: a randomized clinical trial
Published in
CMAJ, April 2018
DOI 10.1503/cmaj.170432
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pietro Di Santo, David T. Harnett, Trevor Simard, F. Daniel Ramirez, Ali Pourdjabbar, Altayyeb Yousef, Robert Moreland, Jordan Bernick, George Wells, Alexander Dick, Michel Le May, Marino Labinaz, Derek So, Pouya Motazedian, Richard G. Jung, Jaya Chandrasekhar, Roxana Mehran, Aun-Yeong Chong, Benjamin Hibbert

Abstract

Radial artery access is commonly performed for coronary angiography and invasive hemodynamic monitoring. Despite limitations in diagnostic accuracy, the modified Allen test (manual occlusion of radial and ulnar arteries followed by release of the latter and assessment of palmar blush) is used routinely to evaluate the collateral circulation to the hand and, therefore, to determine patient eligibility for radial artery access. We sought to evaluate whether a smartphone application may provide a superior alternative to the modified Allen test. We compared the modified Allen test with a smartphone heart rate-monitoring application (photoplethysmography readings detected using a smartphone camera lens placed on the patient's index finger) in patients undergoing a planned cardiac catheterization. Test order was randomly assigned in a 1:1 fashion. All patients then underwent conventional plethysmography of the index finger, followed by Doppler ultrasonography of the radial and ulnar arteries (the diagnostic standard). The primary outcome was diagnostic accuracy of the heart rate-monitoring application. Among 438 patients who were included in the study, we found that the heart rate-monitoring application had a superior diagnostic accuracy compared with the modified Allen test (91.8% v. 81.7%,p= 0.002), attributable to its greater specificity (93.0% v. 82.8%,p= 0.001). We also found that this application had greater diagnostic accuracy for assessment of radial or ulnar artery patency in the ipsilateral and contralateral wrist (94.0% v. 84.0%,p< 0.001). A smartphone application used at the bedside was diagnostically superior to traditional physical examination for confirming ulnar patency before radial artery access. This study highlights the potential for smartphone-based diagnostics to aid in clinical decision-making at the patient's bedside.Trial registration:Clinicaltrials.gov, no. NCT02519491.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 86 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 2 33%
Student > Master 1 17%
Other 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Unspecified 1 17%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 2 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 33%
Computer Science 1 17%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 345. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2018.
All research outputs
#23,652
of 11,350,565 outputs
Outputs from CMAJ
#48
of 5,261 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,458
of 243,735 outputs
Outputs of similar age from CMAJ
#4
of 117 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,350,565 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,261 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,735 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 117 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.