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CMAJ

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Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in premature and avoidable mortality in Canada, 1991–2016

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Medical Association Journal, September 2020
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
72 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
6 Mendeley
Title
Trends in socioeconomic inequalities in premature and avoidable mortality in Canada, 1991–2016
Published in
Canadian Medical Association Journal, September 2020
DOI 10.1503/cmaj.191723
Pubmed ID
Authors

Faraz Vahid Shahidi, Abtin Parnia, Arjumand Siddiqi

Abstract

Recent epidemiologic findings suggest that socioeconomic inequalities in health may be widening over time. We examined trends in socioeconomic inequalities in premature and avoidable mortality in Canada. We conducted a population-based repeated cohort study using the 1991, 1996, 2001, 2006 and 2011 Canadian Census Health and Environment Cohorts. We linked individual-level Census records for adults aged 25-74 years to register-based mortality data. We defined premature mortality as death before age 75 years. For each census cohort, we estimated age-standardized rates, risk differences and risk ratios for premature and avoidable mortality by level of household income and education. We identified 16 284 045 Census records. Between 1991 and 2016, premature mortality rates declined in all socioeconomic groups except for women without a high school diploma. Absolute income-related inequalities narrowed among men (from 2478 to 1915 deaths per 100 000) and widened among women (from 1008 to 1085 deaths per 100 000). Absolute education-related inequalities widened among men and women. Relative socioeconomic inequalities in premature mortality widened progressively over the study period. For example, the relative risk of premature mortality associated with the lowest income quintile increased from 2.10 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.02-2.17) to 2.79 (95% CI 2.66-2.91) among men and from 1.72 (95% CI 1.63- 1.81) to 2.50 (95% CI 2.36-2.64) among women. Similar overall trends were observed for avoidable mortality. Socioeconomically disadvantaged groups have not benefited equally from recent declines in premature and avoidable mortality in Canada. Efforts to reduce socioeconomic inequalities and associated patterns of disadvantage are necessary to prevent this pattern of widening health inequalities from persisting or worsening over time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 72 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 6 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 6 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 1 17%
Researcher 1 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 17%
Student > Bachelor 1 17%
Professor 1 17%
Other 1 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 3 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 17%
Social Sciences 1 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 216. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2020.
All research outputs
#84,615
of 16,060,661 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Medical Association Journal
#189
of 7,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,511
of 230,939 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Medical Association Journal
#8
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,060,661 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,080 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,939 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.